Body Art

Body Art

Body art is defined as body piercing, tattooing, branding, scarification, subdermal implants, tongue splitting, transdermal implants, or the application of permanent cosmetics. Environmental health professionals play an important role in inspecting and regulating body art establishments where the practices of body art are performed.


NEHA Body Art Initiative

NEHA is dedicated to supporting environmental health professionals in the regulation and inspection of body art facilities and is proud to partner with the AFDO Body Art Committee and the Body Art Education Alliance. NEHA first introduced the Body Art Model Code in 1998. The NEHA Body Art Committee updated the Body Art Model Code in 2019 and created a supporting Annex. NEHA is also working with our partners to support environmental health practitioners and the body art industry with the following initiatives:
  • Body Art Training Needs Assessment
  • Body Art Inspection Training
  • Body Art Inspection Job Aids
  • Recommendations for areas of research related to body art
Contact bodyart@neha.org for questions regarding our Body Art Initiative.

Body Art Resources

Please visit our resources page to find tools to support safe body art operations.

VIEW Resources


Newly Released - Body Art Model Code Annex

The NEHA Body Art Model Annex was developed to provide justification, rationale, and best practices to support the requirements outlined in the NEHA Body Art Model Code. The Annex is available for state and local agencies and other organizations as a resource for updating body art codes and protecting public health.

VIEW NEHA BODY ART MODEL CODE ANNEX 

EH Topics: 

NEHA’s Policy Statement on Microblading

NEHA recommends that microblading and permanent cosmetic procedures be held to the same standards as other tattooing techniques as outlined in the NEHA Body Art Model Code to ensure safe body art procedures and to protect public health. NEHA advocates for national, state, and local policies, regulations, research, and resources that will enhance the ability of environmental health professionals to ensure the practice of safe body art procedures.

NEHA’s Policy Statement on Ear Piercing Guns

NEHA recommends that ear piercing gun use be held to the same standards as other piercing techniques as outlined in the NEHA Body Art Model Code to ensure safe body art procedures and to protect public health. NEHA advocates for national, state, and local policies, regulations, research, and resources that will enhance the ability of environmental health professionals to ensure the practice of safe body art procedures.

Webinar: Body Art and Environmental Health

This webinar occurred on January 18, 2018 at 12pm MDT. You can view the recording below.

This activity has been approved for 1 NEHA Continuing Education hour.

Agenda: 

  1. Katherine Sweeney, REHS, Sanitarian at Kent County, Michigan Health Department 
    Topic: Katherine will highlight how environmental health and body art fit together, the role of environmental health professionals in responding to illegal tattoo artists, microblading, and the importance of building relationships between regulators and body artists.  
  2. Cathy Montie, Bloodborne Pathogen Instructor at Cathy Montie Body Art Training Company and Owner of Absolute Tattoo, Piercing and Permanent Cosmetics.   
    Topic: Cathy will discuss potential bloodborne pathogens present in the body art environment, and what plans and preventive actions can be taken to prevent outbreaks.

View Body Art and Environmental Health Webinar 

EH Topics: 

Body Art and Partnerships

Together with the body art industry, FDA, AFDO and state and local regulators, NEHA is working to revise its Body Art Model Code (BAMC). The group is working to update the Code in a way that is reflective of current body art trends and procedures, as well as relevant and implementable to industry professionals.

Earlier this year, I accompanied a local environmental health specialist on a body art studio inspection. The tattoo shop had a very cool aesthetic, with exposed brick, art, and repurposed decorations on the walls; the tattoo artists were friendly and accommodating.

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